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dc.contributor.authorHarper, Adam
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-02T11:38:32Z
dc.date.available2016-05-23T13:13:08Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1612-8001
dc.identifier.urihttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:hebis:26-opus-120834
dc.identifier.urihttps://jlupub.ub.uni-giessen.de//handle/jlupub/988
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.22029/jlupub-857
dc.description.abstractThe value placed on rural musicians is a consistent characteristic of independent popular music culture, particularly with respect to »lo-fi« aesthetics. Antipathetic to what they saw as excessively industrialised and commercialised popular music, urban folk and rock fans have recurrently sought satisfaction in musics of peripheral areas that were considered archaic or »primitive,« conflating musical and geographical distance. Beginning by tracing the roots of this process in Romanticism and folk revivals, I examine the cases and receptions of artists such as Roscoe Halcomb, Hasil Adkins, Beat Happening and Guided By Voices.en
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.rightsIn Copyright*
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/page/InC/1.0/*
dc.subject.ddcddc:780de_DE
dc.titleBackwoods: rural distance and authenticity in twentieth-Century American independent folk and rock discourseen
dc.typearticlede_DE
dcterms.isPartOf2146766-3de_DE
local.affiliationExternde_DE
local.source.journaltitleSamples
local.source.volume14
local.source.articlenumber01
local.opus.id12083
local.opus.fachgebietExterne Einrichtungende_DE


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