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dc.contributor.authorSchreiner, Tamara
dc.contributor.authorEggerstorfer, Naila M.
dc.contributor.authorMorlock, Gertrud E.
dc.date.accessioned2024-02-07T13:08:02Z
dc.date.available2024-02-07T13:08:02Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttps://jlupub.ub.uni-giessen.de//handle/jlupub/18982
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.22029/jlupub-18343
dc.description.abstractCurrent strategies for non-target food screening focus mainly on known hazardous chemicals (adulterants, residues, contaminants, packaging migrants, etc.) instead of bioactive constituents in general and exclude the biological effect detection. To widen the perspective, a more proactive non-target effect-directed strategy is introduced to complement food safety in order to detect not only known but also unknown bioactive compounds. The developed 10-dimensional hyphenation included on-surface digestion (1D), planar chromatographic separation (2D), visualization using white light (3D), UV light (4D), fluorescence light (5D), effect-directed assay analysis (6D), heart-cut zone elution to an orthogonal reversed phase column chromatography including online desalting (7D) with subsequent diode array detection (8D), high-resolution mass spectrometry (9D), and fragmentation (10D). Metabolism, i.e., intestinal digestion of each sample, was simulated and integrated on the same adsorbent surface to study any changes in the compound profiles. As proof of principle, nine convenience tomato products and a freshly prepared tomato soup were screened via five different planar assays in a non-targeted mode. Non-digested and digested samples were compared side by side. In their effect-directed profiles, 14 bioactive compounds from classes of lipids, plant hormones, spices, and pesticides were identified. In particular, bioactive compounds coming from the lipid class were increased by gastrointestinal digestion, while spices and pesticides remained unaffected. With regard to food safety, the determination of the two dinitrophenol herbicides dinoterb and dinoseb in highly processed tomato products should be given special attention. The hyphenation covered a broad analyte spectrum and showed robust and reliable results.de_DE
dc.description.sponsorshipDeutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG); ROR-ID:018mejw64de_DE
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subject.ddcddc:630de_DE
dc.titleTowards non-target proactive food safety: identification of active compounds in convenience tomato products by ten-dimensional hyphenation with integrated simulated gastrointestinal digestionde_DE
dc.typearticlede_DE
local.affiliationFB 09 - Agrarwissenschaften, Ökotrophologie und Umweltmanagementde_DE
local.projectINST 162/536-1 FUGG and INST 162/471-1 FUGGde_DE
local.source.spage715de_DE
local.source.epage731de_DE
local.source.journaltitleAnalytical and bioanalytical chemistryde_DE
local.source.volume416de_DE
local.source.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00216-023-04656-0de_DE


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