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dc.contributor.authorHoller, Manfred J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-08T19:45:10Z
dc.date.available2021-12-08T19:45:10Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttps://jlupub.ub.uni-giessen.de//handle/jlupub/424
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.22029/jlupub-357
dc.description.abstractThis paper uses the concept of power to analyze Machiavelli's The Prince and the Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livius. This helps to distil the elements that form the Machiavelli program that has its short-term aim in the formation of a national state of Italy. A unification of Italy under the umbrella of a princely family (such as identified with Cesare Borgia) was meant to be the first stage in an evolutionary process which, in the end, could lead to a more or less stable republican system. For the latter, the Roman Republic as described in the Discourses is Machiavelli's model. The use of power, but also the minimization of cruelties, and the participation of the people, either in the form of militia to successfully fight foreign armies or to support the princely government, are major ingredients to this process.de_DE
dc.language.isoende_DE
dc.subject.ddcddc:100de_DE
dc.subject.ddcddc:330de_DE
dc.titleNiccolò Machiavelli on Powerde_DE
dc.typearticlede_DE
dcterms.isPartOf2536124-7
local.affiliationExterne Einrichtungende_DE
local.source.spage335de_DE
local.source.epage354de_DE
local.source.journaltitleRationality, markets, and morals: RMMde_DE
local.source.volume0de_DE


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